DAN HARDY, PE, PTP

Principal | Arlington, VA

About Dan: 

Inquisitive, Positive, Husband
Dad, Sunsets, Sabrmetrician
Phillies fan

Experience:

27 years

Education: 

BS, Civil Engineering, Michigan State University

MS, Civil Engineering, Michican State Unviersity

Bio:

Dan Hardy is a Managing Principal with Renaissance Planning and has experience in developing transportation solutions that balance transportation and land use options to optimize multimodal travel demand and transportation network services in congested communities. 

Prior to joining Renaissance, Dan served as the Transportation Planning Chief for the Montgomery County Planning Department. Dan managed a 15-person Transportation Planning Division responsible for transportation elements of Countywide growth policies, master plans, and development review cases in a rapidly growing County of nearly one million residents with high expectations for involvement in decision making. His expertise includes both developing and applying growth management policies and practices.

I believe...

One of the things I love about being a transportation planner is that everyone is a stakeholder.  We all need to go places, we all need things delivered to us, and everyone has creative ideas about how their traveling needs would best be served.  Travel patterns are also influenced by the systems we engineer for them; traffic (across all modes) is essentially fluid flow with attitude. 


The challenge for the planner is to assemble the thousands of individual behaviors and desires into a collective narrative and help decision makers understand how the story can be written to have a happier ending. Progressive policies, services, and infrastructure are all complementary tools in the toolbox for building, and sustaining, great communities. Sometimes you actually have a nail and should use the proverbial hammer, other times you might want the pen. The emergence of sustainability as a formal paradigm in the planning arena is a welcome reminder that long-range economic, environmental, and equity considerations should all be balanced in picking the right set of tools.